HomePostsNIC CommunityNIC Play – 2nd Year does “Blue Box” by Carmen Aguirre!
Our Acting Conservatory students work hard to become some of the best actors out there, and they more than proved that with the incredibly successful run of Craig March‘s amazing adaptation of Carmen Aguirre‘s Blue BoxOur full cast presented a normally single-cast play with professionalism, talent, and poise, bringing new dimensions and tonalities to Aguirre’s already great play.
 
Some of the reviews they received were:
 
Beautiful work”, “Awesome!”, “Didn’t know how you would take a one-person show and turn it into a play for an 11 member cast, but it was done brilliantly!”
 
From the Playwright, Carmen Aguirre:
 
“I had the pleasure of watching a dress rehearsal of my play Blue Box today at New Image College. Beautiful work by the students and amazing directorial vision by Craig March.”
 
From fellow instructor, Mackenzie Gray:
 
“The show was terrific”
 
From alumnus, Roberto Gutierrez:
 
“Congrats! You guys killed opening night!”
 
Lynn Mockler, audience member:
 
“Great work by these young actors with their very inspired direction and director! Bravo Craig!!”
 
From current student, Jarod Marcil:
 
“YOU GUYS GOTTA SEE THIS SHOW HOLY CROW I’M FRIGGIN’ HONORED JUST TO BE GOING TO THE SAME SCHOOL AS THIS TALENTED CAST AND CREW!!! BLUE BOX, BE THERE TOMORROW, OR BE A BIG NERD! Thank you Craig March for the incredible show that you’ve adapted.”
 
If you missed our students in action this time around, make sure you come to our next play, coming soon! Keep your eyes pealed on our NIC Event Calendar and here on the Community page for all upcoming events! It would be an honour and a pleasure to have you!
 
About Blue Box:
 
Six years after fleeing the 1973 military coup in Chile, eleven-year-old Carmen Aguirre and her family return to join the underground resistance. At eighteen, Carmen commits herself to the movement, running a safe house on the border between Chile and Argentina. Forfeiting her first marriage to the pressures of revolutionary life, and living with the ever-present fear of capture and torture, Carmen realizes the sacrifices she who unconditionally loves the cause must make.
 
Fifteen years later, in Los Angeles, Carmen once again unconditionally gives everything of herself – for love of a different kind. She begins a sexually passionate but emotionally impossible relationship with a handsome Chicano TV star whom she pursues as relentlessly as she herself was once hunted.
 
Emphasizing the tensions between these two modalities of loving, Aguirre’s sexy, fast-paced, and darkly comic monologue ultimately asks: Between the extremes of love for the political cause and love for another, how and where does one create space for self-love?